Road safety charity welcomes plans to allow learner drivers onto motorways

Tearing up L plate after passing driving test

Tearing up L plate after passing driving test - Credit: Getty Images/iStockphoto

A Welwyn Garden City-based road safety charity has welcomed the ‘long overdue’ plans to allow learner drivers onto motorways from 2018.

IAM RoadSmart, which is based in Albany Place, Hyde Way, has given the thumbs up to the Government’s plan to allow learner drivers on motorways to improve safety.

The leading independent road safety charity says the changes should make a significant difference to accident rates amongst new and inexperienced drivers.

The plans were announced on Saturday evening by Transport Secretary Chris Grayling, following a consultation on the idea at the end of 2016.

Neil Greig, IAM RoadSmart director of policy and research, said: “It makes no sense that new drivers learn by trial and, sometimes fatal, error how to use our fastest and most important roads.

The M25 near Potters Bar from the air [Picture: Atlas Drones]

The M25 near Potters Bar from the air [Picture: Atlas Drones] - Credit: Atlas Drones


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“Allowing learners on motorways with an approved instructor is a sensible and measured solution that should deliver confident new drivers who are much better able to cope with complex smart motorways.”

Learners will only be allowed on motorways with an approved driving instructor in a dual control car.

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The Government says this will provide a broader range of real life experiences and better prepare learners for independent driving when they pass their test.

Currently learners cannot drive on a motorway until after they have passed their test.

The M25 from the air looking down towards South Mimms [Picture: Atlas Drones]

The M25 from the air looking down towards South Mimms [Picture: Atlas Drones] - Credit: Atlas Drones

This means the first experience of motorway driving for many is as a nervous novice without the guidance of a driving instructor or the safety of a dual control car.

The changes take place in England, Wales and Scotland only from 2018.

Mr Greig added that a forthcoming IAM RoadSmart report will show that new drivers struggle to adapt to motorways more than other roads, and currently need more time to learn how to use them safely.

This is especially true when it comes to negotiating slip roads.

The full report, produced in association with TRL, will be issued later this year.

• What do you think? Should learner drivers be allowed on motorways? Email letters@whtimes.co.uk

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