Sue takes Issue with tight-fisted townsfolk

PUBLISHED: 11:24 20 February 2008 | UPDATED: 21:32 26 October 2009

FOR one former charity worker, the importance of helping those people still struggling with poverty is still a big issue. Sue Jessop used to help out the Herts Young Homeless Group, and now wants to highlight the importance of the charity magazine The Big

FOR one former charity worker, the importance of helping those people still struggling with poverty is still a big issue.

Sue Jessop used to help out the Herts Young Homeless Group, and now wants to highlight the importance of the charity magazine The Big Issue.

The magazine has sellers in WGC town centre and Sue believes these sellers should get more support from the public.

Sue, of Eggington Crescent, WGC, said: "I don't think enough people know what The Big Issue is.

"If people knew some of the stories behind the The Big Issue then I think they would be more interested.

The 48-year-old added: "I was speaking to one seller in WGC town centre and she was in tears because she had only sold one issue and she had to go home and feed her two children.

"It is very sad, and if people understood their situation more then I'm sure they would be more supportive."

The Big Issue is written and edited by professional journalists and sold by homeless people.

It aims to give the homeless the chance to make an income.

To become a vendor you must be homeless or "vulnerably housed".

The Big Issue is bought by its sellers for 70p and sold for £1.50, with the profit being put back in to The Big Issue charity to support the homeless.

The magazine aims to raise awareness of social issues such as poverty and discrimination and offers broad articles covering music, the arts and lots more.

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