Welwyn Garden City police HQ flies LGBT rainbow flag

PUBLISHED: 15:49 18 May 2018 | UPDATED: 15:59 18 May 2018

Herts police joined numerous groups, including Who Not What and YC Hertfordshire, for the flag raising. Picture: supplied by Herts police

Herts police joined numerous groups, including Who Not What and YC Hertfordshire, for the flag raising. Picture: supplied by Herts police

supplied by Herts police

Flying the flag for LGBT+ rights, Herts Police screened an awareness-raising film at their Welwyn Garden City headquarters on Thursday (May 17).

A still from the film A still from the film "What is a Hate Crime?". Picture: Youtube

In celebration of the International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia and Transphobia (IDAHoBiT) police and crime commissioner David Lloyd also hoisted the LGTB+ flag at his offices at Harpenden police station.

As well as the flag raising, police hosted the first screening of ‘What is a Hate Crime?’, a short film by LGBT group Who Not What and YC Hertfordshire.

Who not What is a group of young people supported by YC Hertfordshire who have come together to represent the voice of the young lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning communities of Hertfordshire.

Aimed at people over 13, ‘What is a Hate Crime?’ aims to raise awareness of hate crime and how people can report it.

Members of Who Not What and YC Hertfordshire were joined by David Lloyd, the fire and rescue service, Herts Aid, Herts for Learning, NHS Hertfordshire, and the University of Hertfordshire at the flag raising and screening.

Chief superintendent Matthew Nicholls is Herts Police’s lead for sexual orientation and gender identity.

He said: “Every year we are proud to raise the rainbow flag on IDAHOBiT Day.

“We want to make it clear to the LGBT+ community that if they are a victim of a homophobic, transphobic or biphobic crime, they should not hesitate to report it to police.

A still from the film A still from the film "What is a Hate Crime?". Picture: Youtube

“All of our officers take victims and witnesses seriously and will treat them with sensitivity, but victims can also be put into contact with one of our specially trained LGBT+ liaison officers who can offer additional support.”

Speaking about the film, he said: “I’m sure it will make a real difference to young people who might find themselves a victim and encourage them to report offences.”

Chief constable Charlie Hall said: “I am delighted that we are supporting IDAHOBiT day again this year.

“We are committed to providing the best service to all our diverse communities and the LGBT+ community is an important part of this.”

Hertfordshire Constabulary has created dedicated teams that represent the county’s wide-ranging communities covering sexual orientation and transgender, age, religion and belief, race, disability and gender.

Victims of hate crime – including transgender people and victims of homophobia – can report offences directly to police via the non-emergency number 101 or 999 in an emergency.

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