Hatfield pupil earrings row rumbles on

A SINGLE mum-of-four is remaining defiant in a battle with a school after her daughter was banned from lessons in a dispute over pierced ears. Christine Wood has refused to buckle and 11-year-old Kirstie Browne has stayed away from Onslow St Audrey's Scho

A SINGLE mum-of-four is remaining defiant in a battle with a school after her daughter was banned from lessons in a dispute over pierced ears.

Christine Wood has refused to buckle and 11-year-old Kirstie Browne has stayed away from Onslow St Audrey's School for more than four weeks.

Even after admitting her child's education might suffer, the 35-year-old Hatfield mum STILL will not remove her daughter's earrings.

Ms Wood, of Stockbreach Road, told the WHT: "I refuse to take her earrings out because other people at the school have piercings.


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"We're being victimised as the school doesn't care if other people have piercings, just Kirstie.

"Her education will suffer but she is bright and I'm hoping she'll bounce back."

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The saga started when Kirstie got her ears pierced on March 8.

Once returning to the Old Rectory Drive establishment Kirstie was asked to abide by the school's strict no jewellery policy and take out her earrings.

She declined.

When asked about previously signing the school agreement, which stated jewellery was not allowed, Ms Wood said: "To be honest I didn't take it seriously, parents don't. I thought if she were to wear jewellery they [the school] would not do anything."

Ms Wood, denied headteacher Paul Meredith's claims that class work was being sent home for her daughter, saying:. "She hasn't been sent any work.

"I don't see an end to this. We will consider moving her to another school."

Headteacher Paul Meredith said: "I look forward to Kirstie's return to school and hope to see her at the start of next term.

"As all parties know, the newly pierced ears need not be a problem as we are prepared to supervise Kirstie briefly inserting and rotating the studs at break and lunch times, provided the earrings are handed over to staff for safekeeping for the rest of the day.

"I was pleased to read the letters of support from your readers. One of my jobs is to drive up standards, and I believe standards begin with small things such as jewellery and uniform.

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