Escaped prisoner from Hatfield still at large

A FUGITIVE from Hatfield, who escaped from a low security prison last week, is still at large. Police are still searching for Shane Marvin Anderson, 26, who absconded from HMP Sudbury, a category D ""open"" prison in Derbyshire, on Monday.

A FUGITIVE from Hatfield, who escaped from a low security prison last week, is still at large.

Police are still searching for Shane Marvin Anderson, 26, who absconded from HMP Sudbury, a category D "open" prison in Derbyshire, on Monday.

Anderson, formerly of Lemsford Road, Hatfield, was serving a four-and-a-half year sentence for robbery, common assault and failure to surrender to police custody.

He was jailed by Luton Crown Court in September 2006.


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Welwyn Hatfield MP Grant Shapps questioned the decision to place Anderson in such an institution, where prisoners can simply walk out, and are trusted to return.

"Considering the crimes involve robbery, common assault and failure to surrender to policy custody, it's difficult to understand how such a low security prison was thought to be the right option in this case," said Mr Shapps.

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"The fact the individual has now escaped demonstrates this was the wrong choice. I hope that, for the sake of public protection, all of this will be properly taken into account by any court which considers this case in the future."

A spokeswoman for HMP Sudbury said: "Open prisons are the most effective means of ensuring prisoners are tested in the community before they are released.

"To release prisoners directly from a closed prison without the resettlement benefits of the open estate would undoubtedly lead to higher levels of post-release re-offending.

"Time in open prisons affords prisoners the opportunity to find work, re-establish family ties, reintegrate into the community and ensure housing needs are met.

"For long-term prisoners this is essential for successful resettlement and an important factor in protecting the public.

"All those (prisoners) located in open conditions have been rigorously risk assessed and categorised as being of low risk to the public. Although the nature of open prisons means that we can never guarantee that prisoners will not abscond, the number of those who do is now at its lowest level for ten years.

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