Happy Days for pupils as The Fonz visits

A FAMOUS actor turned best-selling children’s author visited a Times Territory school to talk to pupils about difficulties they may face during their education.

Henry Winkler – best known for his role as The Fonz in US TV sitcom Happy Days, spoke at Goffs Oak Primary School last Wednesday as part of his campaign ‘My Way!’.

The campaign raises awareness of the fact that one in five children experience learning challenges in their formative years.

The New Yorker has been working with Henkel – which produces brands such as Pritt and Persil, and is based in Bishop Square, Hatfield – during the tour to dispel the myths that these children are in some way less intelligent than those able to learn in the ‘traditional’ way.

Henry also introduced the youngsters to an extract from one of his 17 Zank Ziper books, which follow a 10-year-old boy with dyslexia, in a series which has already sold 2.5m copies in the US.

The 64-year-old said: “School was unbelievably hard for me. Teachers didn’t know what dyslexia was at that time. So I was labelled a trouble maker.

“Just because we learn differently, that does not mean that we are not incredibly smart human beings. That’s something I need every child to understand.”

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Headteacher Chris Tofallis said: “It was a great experience for the children and Henry’s talk was very inspirational and uplifting.

“We were thrilled to spend time with Henry, he was very kind and open and was brilliant during the question time with the children.”

Dave McCann, marketing director at Henkel, added: “Working with Goffs Oak, one of our local schools, we have been able to be involved in creative expression and see how important arts and crafts are to children’s development.”

Henry was also joined at the Millcrest Road school by the editor of First News, the widest-read weekly children’s publication in the UK, and will continue to tour round Britain’s schools.

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